Central American Young Women Project

We are raising funds for the implementation of the Central American Young Women Project. 

Homies Unidos, Inc.

Our story

Homies Unidos is grateful and proud of being part of our community achievements, we have done so much with your support which its been vital, without the Central American Youth Council would not be there. Although we are gaining momentum in some communities of Los Angeles, there is still a stronger need to empower young indigenous women in South Central, Westlake and Pico-Union. 

The Central American Young Women are there, asking for real and more human livelihood, where a more needed and specific space is sustained for/by/with them, to flourish all their abilities, skills and accomplish their thousand times broken dreams due to unaccounted violence, abuse, that has prevented them to have a sense of identity and build together the needed popular power, to redefine a clear road to recovery, equality and unity within their own selves, families and communities.  Frequently we indicate the unaccompanied minors’ epiphany, we have devoted considerate resources and hearts to support their cause to survive, progress and have a better future.  Nevertheless, it is an endless road of challenges, we have realized that we are slowly making progress as a community by creating social services centralized for boys but not specific for young girls, which would bring awareness to gender, race, identity and cultural biases.  

The Central American Young Women Project would map the road to self-awareness and women, cultural identity and origins, how to prevent violence and sexual abuse, teen pregnancy, lack of jobs, professional development and many other issues that ultimately rest on the hands and arms of the future women of our communities, women are essential and the soul of our communities’ strengths and weaknesses.  The young women of today and the future women of tomorrow that have to have a specific space to pave the community recovery, healing and self-recognition of its potential, with the unquestionable gifts and contributions of the Young Women.  They will go trough the Xinachtli curriculum for indigenous women, the Young Leadership Program and the II Central American Youth Leadership Conference, to eventually consolidate the Central American Youth Council in conjunction with the young men.     

Why it matters?

The Central American Young Women Project will ensure this youth a successful, healthy, safe, and well-supported integration to our communities.  The Project would map the road to self-awareness and women, cultural identity and origins, how to prevent violence and sexual abuse, teen pregnancy, lack of jobs, professional development and many other issues that ultimately rest on the hands and arms of the future women of our communities, women are essential and the soul of our communities’ strengths and weaknesses.  The young women of today and the future women of tomorrow that have to have a specific space to pave the community recovery, healing and self-recognition of its potential, with the unquestionable gifts and contributions of the Young Women.

We will measure our work base in the level of involvement and recreating the curriculum among the indigenous young women commitment and readapting the content to Central American cultural standards.  Based on the momentum already established in Los Angeles, focusing on organizing youth and involvement in community members, we will also implement a combination of pre and post questionnaires, focus groups and follow up communication forms will be utilized to implement and measure success of the goals.  With feedback from the young women and community who attended the Leadership Training, forums and advocacy efforts, we can better determine the needs of the youth and families we support and how to meet them.

How will the funds be used?

Homies Unidos is already doing the work with 7 girls out of 30 participants in two high schools, which is better this year in comparison with one from last year.  But they are included within The Joven Noble curriculum, which is mostly for young boys.  Regardless we achieve or not the whole goal, the funds will be focus in human investment, with the goal to compensate with stipends some of the most committed young women and Homies Unidos staff.  They will have to reassess the needs, readapt the curriculum, build a proper work plan and implement the project starting this summer.   

The major people contribution is getting the word out, sharing our campaign with all their social media and personal contacts.

With your monetary help, we’ll raise funds to continue helping unaccompanied minors integrate into their community, homes and schools. We will be able to remove tattoo of young man and women who now enjoy a better employment and have reduced the possibilities of being a target of violence or police harassment.  

If you make a gift online today, we will be able to continue helping our community in stopping another cycle of violence and empower our members to become agents of change.



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Givers

J

Jasmin Iraheta

So excited for this!

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Martha Arevalo

I'm inspired! Thank you for such a great project.

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Oscar Madrigal

Adelante!!!

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Joana A Reyes

I wish this program the best!

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Alexander Sanchez

I have seen how our young women need us. Be part of it!!!!#mujeres

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Melinda Isordia

This donation is on behalf of Stacey Calvillo.

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Jessica Davis Herceg

I'd support any work associated with Melinda Isordia! She is an inspiration.

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Steven Osuna

Keep it moving!

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Marlom Portillo

Please Support the Central American Young Women #Gomujeres @HIPgive @SouthwestAir

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Elana Zilberg

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Gustavo A Guerra Vasquez

R

Ryuichi Nakayama

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Suyapa Portillo

R

Rebecca Schreiber

K

Kency Cornejo

M

Maricela Lopez

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Mason Costantino

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Anonymous

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Oriel Maria Siu

R

Robert Lujan

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Heidi W. Gamble

A

Anonymous

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sandra sunshine williams

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Anonymous

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Adam Vine

M

Melinda Isordia





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The team

Melinda Isordia

Melinda Isordia is the Program Director of Homies Unidos. She is also a student at Los Angeles Trade Technical College, and is a part of a community led collective call Solidarity House of the South in South Central. Melinda’s Program Director.
Currently Melinda focuses on managing and coordinating the Youth Leadership Training Program and an all-girl rites of passage program called Xinachtli. Office management is another concentration Melinda has in the organization. Ultimately, her dream is to see more proud, confident, and compassionate communities.
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Melinda Isordia is the Program Director of Homies Unidos. She is also a student at Los Angeles Trade Technical College, and is a part of a community led collective call Solidarity House of the South in South Central. Melinda’s Program Director.
Currently Melinda focuses on managing and coordinating the Youth Leadership Training Program and an all-girl rites of passage program called Xinachtli. Office management is another concentration Melinda has in the organization. Ultimately, her dream is to see more proud, confident, and compassionate communities.

Paula Guadron

Project Coordinator

Currently Paula Guadron is coordinating the Joven Noble (Noble Youth) Program. She has been volunteering her time at Homies’ since the beginning of 2014, and has become familiar with the organization needs and services provided for the youth population. Homies Unidos currently serves. She has earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from CSULA, where she also participated in Cross-Cultural Research to study the Psychological effects of Race and Institutional Discrimination on People of Color. Paula also worked as a Domestic Violence Advocate and Crisis Intervention Worker in collaboration with LAPD to assist victims in the area of Watts. She also has worked at S.T.A.Y. (Standing Together Advocating for our Youth) co-organizer, actively participating in building dialogue about community issues in Echo Park and surrounding areas.
Ms. Guadron advocacy work the last 15 years has been in Environmental Justice, Mental Health, Housing, and Homeless Youth Outreach, as well as Wilderness Restoration and Preservation. Paula is a L.A. native, born and raised in Echo Park in the 1980’s. As an Echo Park local, her experiences as an LGBTQ-Salvadorian-Mexican-Chicana youth of color/urban native have instilled in her sense of responsibility to her extended community, and an urgency to make immediate social changes. She is committed to co-creating alternative, pro-social, effective solutions to community mental health needs, specifically for underserved groups such as Central-American youth and their families. I believe in non-violent transformative justice, and in the potential of all marginalized groups to become healthy, successful, and thriving community members.
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Currently Paula Guadron is coordinating the Joven Noble (Noble Youth) Program. She has been volunteering her time at Homies’ since the beginning of 2014, and has become familiar with the organization needs and services provided for the youth population. Homies Unidos currently serves. She has earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from CSULA, where she also participated in Cross-Cultural Research to study the Psychological effects of Race and Institutional Discrimination on People of Color. Paula also worked as a Domestic Violence Advocate and Crisis Intervention Worker in collaboration with LAPD to assist victims in the area of Watts. She also has worked at S.T.A.Y. (Standing Together Advocating for our Youth) co-organizer, actively participating in building dialogue about community issues in Echo Park and surrounding areas.
Ms. Guadron advocacy work the last 15 years has been in Environmental Justice, Mental Health, Housing, and Homeless Youth Outreach, as well as Wilderness Restoration and Preservation. Paula is a L.A. native, born and raised in Echo Park in the 1980’s. As an Echo Park local, her experiences as an LGBTQ-Salvadorian-Mexican-Chicana youth of color/urban native have instilled in her sense of responsibility to her extended community, and an urgency to make immediate social changes. She is committed to co-creating alternative, pro-social, effective solutions to community mental health needs, specifically for underserved groups such as Central-American youth and their families. I believe in non-violent transformative justice, and in the potential of all marginalized groups to become healthy, successful, and thriving community members.

Alex Sanchez

Alex Sanchez, is the Executive Director of the Los Angeles branch of Homies Unidos, an organization in the Pico Union and Koreatown area of Los Angeles with a sister organization in San Salvador. A former gang member who after serving prison time California State Prison was deported back to El Salvador in 1994. While in El Salvador he was targeted by Death Squads operating in his home town. He returned committed to change his life for the better. In 1998 he started implementing programs geared to youth in gangs. In 2000 he was targeted by the Rampart police and became part of the infamous Rampart scandal, Alex was freed later that year and in 2002 won Political Asylum. He continues his work in the community. He has received countless awards and recognitions from the City of Los Angeles, Organizations and Foundations.
To understand the Gang subculture, you need to understand how politics and policy has played a major role in spreading gangs from Los Angeles to other continents. Alex’s expertise in gang subculture and youth criminalization developed through his experiences as gang member. His dedication to his community on issues of transnational youth violence and criminalized immigrants has made him a unique expert on the issue. He has testified in court as a gang expert for the defense on countless occasions, testified in California’s legislature and in 2005 testified in the United Nations on massacres of incarcerated people in Honduras. Hi personal experience and dedication to our youth has helped in the development of the first policy defining what Gang Intervention is and the strategy to use to reduce gang violence. This definition was adopted by the City of Los Angeles and is currently being translated into Spanish to be introduced in Juarez, Mexico and hopefully El Salvador. Suppression and incarceration are but a bad aid to cover the root causes of the self-destruction of our youth both in Central America and the United States.
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Alex Sanchez, is the Executive Director of the Los Angeles branch of Homies Unidos, an organization in the Pico Union and Koreatown area of Los Angeles with a sister organization in San Salvador. A former gang member who after serving prison time California State Prison was deported back to El Salvador in 1994. While in El Salvador he was targeted by Death Squads operating in his home town. He returned committed to change his life for the better. In 1998 he started implementing programs geared to youth in gangs. In 2000 he was targeted by the Rampart police and became part of the infamous Rampart scandal, Alex was freed later that year and in 2002 won Political Asylum. He continues his work in the community. He has received countless awards and recognitions from the City of Los Angeles, Organizations and Foundations.
To understand the Gang subculture, you need to understand how politics and policy has played a major role in spreading gangs from Los Angeles to other continents. Alex’s expertise in gang subculture and youth criminalization developed through his experiences as gang member. His dedication to his community on issues of transnational youth violence and criminalized immigrants has made him a unique expert on the issue. He has testified in court as a gang expert for the defense on countless occasions, testified in California’s legislature and in 2005 testified in the United Nations on massacres of incarcerated people in Honduras. Hi personal experience and dedication to our youth has helped in the development of the first policy defining what Gang Intervention is and the strategy to use to reduce gang violence. This definition was adopted by the City of Los Angeles and is currently being translated into Spanish to be introduced in Juarez, Mexico and hopefully El Salvador. Suppression and incarceration are but a bad aid to cover the root causes of the self-destruction of our youth both in Central America and the United States.



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