STAND WITH OUR IMMIGRANT FAMILIES

Donate to build a lasting safety net for children and parents who are seeking protection!

Hispanics in Philanthropy

Human Rights

Our story

The Issue:

In the last few months, we have witnessed the worst human rights violations our country has seen in generations. A “zero tolerance” policy, where young children were stripped from their parents’ protective arms. Undocumented immigrants locked in cages along the U.S.-Mexico border, and Asylum seekers, criminalized. The Trump administration’s ham-fisted effort to implement the policy affected more than 2,575 families in about 50 days, according to a Washington Office on Latin America report released in August.

While the images of children being kept in cages have faded from the headlines, the reality is that every day hundreds of asylum seekers fleeing the worst of conditions arrive at our borders. More than half of the exodus is made up of women and children with little access to food, water, or safe places to sleep, according to Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP)’s team on the ground in Mexico.

Our Role:

At HIP, we are doubling our efforts to support immigrant families through this painful moment. Here is how:

  • Understanding the issue from up close: HIP led a delegation to learn about the family separation crisis at U.S.-Mexico border
. The convening brought together more than 55 funders and nonprofit leaders from the U.S. and Mexico with the goal of mobilizing national support and a coordinated philanthropic response to this humanitarian crisis. Learn more. 
  • Addressing the roots of forced migration across in the Americas
. HIP recently partnered with the Central America and Mexico Migration Alliance (CAMMINA) to address the causes of these migration issues including the growing violence and instability in immigrants’ countries of origin, coupled with increasingly restrictive national migration policies.
  • Keeping our partners updated. HIP has organized national conference calls and webinars with key partners in this work to help keep us all updated on the fast-paced changes taking place in immigration and U.S. asylum policy, and to help funders determine where their investments can make the most impact.

As a result of these efforts, many funders, such as the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, The California Endowment,  and Annie E. Casey Foundation, have come together and committed $1 million to HIP’s Family Unity Fund to providing resources and support to direct service providers and legal services on the ground; and to lift up longer-term advocacy efforts on both sides of the border to encourage the adoption of more humane policies. We invite other funders to join our Family Unity Fund.

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

Your support is essential to support immigrants the children and families who have been severely impacted by these damaging policies.

Donate today to help immigrant children and their families receive long-term support from the organizations best prepared to assist. Here’s a list of organization we are seeking to help:

  • Instituto Madre Asunta: the first shelter in Tijuana, Mexico to establish a method of providing dignified assistance to women and children who have been displaced after deportation from the United States, or who are migrating from dangerous situations in Latin America
  • Immigration Justice Project (IJP) of San Diego: provides high quality legal assistance to immigrants who are unable to secure legal representation in the detention facility in San Diego, California
  • Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project: the only organization providing free legal and social services for men, women, and children held in isolated immigration detention centers in Arizona
  • The San Diego Rapid Response Network (SDRRN): a coalition of human rights and service organizations, attorneys, and community leaders dedicated to aiding immigrants and their families in the San Diego border region

You can read more about each of these organizations below.

HIP will match the first $10,000 donated.

Let us show these families – who are risking everything to provide safety for their children – that we are better than these xenophobic government policies. Let the families in need know that you stand with them.

DONATE TODAY TO PROVIDE SUPPORT AND SERVICES TO SEPARATED FAMILIES, NOW AND INTO THE FUTURE.

Please note: Your donation will go directly to organizations providing long-term support to immigrant families. HIPGive does not charge an administrative fee to transfer the funds, and all U.S. donations are tax deductible.

ORGANIZATIONS SUPPORTED:

Instituto Madre Asunta provides three meals per day, clothes, shoes, legal assistance, psychological care, spiritual and medical assistance, as well as access to phones. Madre Asunta has been in existence for 17 years and has helped 17,000 migrant women and children. Currently, they are assisting 115 women and children. Funding can help expand their initiatives by hiring 5 teachers that will offer workshops and classes for children and develop their programs, which equip women who have stayed in Tijuana with entrepreneurship skills and job prospects.

The Immigration Justice Project (IJP) provides high quality legal assistance to immigrants who are unable to secure legal representation through their Legal Orientation Program (LOP) that works in the Otay Mesa Detention Facility in San Diego, California with immigrants who are unable to secure legal representation. Approximately 75 percent of the detained immigrant population held at the detention center continues to be unrepresented. LOP educates individuals, many of whom are parents that have been separated from their children, about their rights in removal proceedings and arms them with tools to represent themselves. Annually the LOP program works with approximately 3,500 detained immigrants. IJP takes on pro bono representation of LOP participants or connects them with outside volunteer attorneys willing to provide pro bono representation.



For nearly 30 years, the Florence Project has been the only organization providing free legal and social services for men, women, and children held in isolated immigration detention centers in Arizona, awaiting deportation. An estimated 86 percent of the detained people go unrepresented due to poverty. This year alone, Florence Project staff has documented more than 600 cases of family separation, a near 400 percent increase from 2017.The Florence Project strives to address this inequity both locally and nationally through direct service, partnerships with the community, and advocacy and outreach efforts.The organization houses an adult team, children’s program, mental health team which serves as the appointed counsel for cases in Arizona, integrated social services, and a pro bono program. With your support, the Florence Project can sustain representation for young children and their parents for years to come.


The SDRRN was activated to respond to increased immigration enforcement activities within San Diego County and humanitarian issues arising at the border, including widespread family separation and unjust deportation of asylum seekers presenting at the Port-of-Entry.

On October 25, Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) ended a program known as “Safe Release,” which helped families requesting asylum at the U.S.-México border connect with family members residing in the United States. Under the “Safe Release” program, ICE supported asylum seeking families by ensuring they had travel plans in place prior to their release. By October 26, ICE began implementing this procedural change, which gives families no time to make plans or book travel before their release. Under this new expedited procedure, after being screened to ensure they pose no security threat, asylum-seeking families are quickly released on their own recognizance with orders to appear at an ICE hearing after reaching their destination city.

To meet the needs of these vulnerable children and families, the San Diego Rapid Response Network (SDRRN) quickly came together to set up a temporary shelter and ensure families had access to food, medical care, legal services and transportation.

Jewish Family Service San Diego is the fiscal agent for SDRRN.

 




Givers

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Eliza Dornbush

Thank you for all you're doing on the ground with our future neighbors and community members at the border.

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Ana Marie

Praying for everyone’s health & safety - remembering that most of our families were migrants at one time.

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Ana Lopez

Con solidaridad

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Jody Pollock

Thank you for the brilliant work you are doing on both sides of the border!

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Carlos Campos mendez

Familias unidas = Pueblos unidos

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Doris B. Yorysh

In memory of David Yorysh

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Carol Kain

We are all immigrants

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Anonymous

La Familia debe estar unida.

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Anonymous

Keep fighting the good fight! God gives the toughest battles to his better sons

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Anonymous

We need to fight for the most vulnerable who have been forced to leave their countries for reasons very much connected to US policies and politics. Please let me know how I can have my company match this donation.

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Katherine Mancera

Families belong together, and immigrants are not criminals.

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Hispanics in Philanthropy

HIP is committed to supporting our immigrant children and families for the long term. Please take a stand and join us!

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Amalia

Families should be together - safe at home and not in jail!

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Claudia DeMegret

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Megan O'Byrne

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Rebecca English

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Brianne Sherman

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Kiley E Moran

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Antonio Rivera

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Danielle Sherman

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William Brown

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Kyle Legleiter

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Marcela Buzo Arguelles

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